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Top Ten Voices of Science (2017)

Posted on Apr 10, 2017

By Sam Young, Matter PR’s Head of Media  |  sam@matterpr.com    We’ve surveyed the International, National, online, trade, and social media coverage so far this year to find out which scientists have been the most influential in the media and who are the leading Voices of Science in 2017. Emerging trends include topics such as robotics, 5G, and autonomous systems as well as significant coverage on what it means to be human, our place in the universe, and the creation of UKRI. At the end of Q1, here’s the Top Ten in our 2017 Voices of Science survey – in...

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Formula for the perfect science PR story

Posted on Sep 8, 2015

Formula for the perfect science PR story

For a long time there was a trend amongst science PR officers for formulaic stories which promoted a particular area of science, an organisation, or a campaign of some sort. Last week, Visit England revived a Royal Academy of Engineering story on Pooh Sticks to promote the best rivers to visit to play the game. Here it is covered by the BBC. In 2004, physicists hit rock bottom when the Institute of Physics released a story to coincide with the release of the final ever episode of Sex in the City. I had some small responsibility for this one and it still sends a shudder of guilty pleasure...

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A very brief history of 1 Victoria Street

Posted on Sep 5, 2013

The site now occupied by the high-rise offices of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on the Eastern corner of Victoria Street has a colourful history. At various times it was home to alms houses for the poor, offices for solicitors, pulpit for Calvinist preachers, and the site of the first printing press where William Caxton achieved the very “first book ever printed in these kingdoms”. 19th Century From 1863, the Eastern corner of Victoria Street was occupied by the Westminster Chambers – a giant office complex for agents, solicitors, and others involved...

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Bubble science

Posted on Jun 4, 2013

Bubble science

In the news today is an interesting story about how researchers at the University of Sheffield have used hot microbubbles to develop a new technique that will allow manufacturers to make food products more efficiently. Whether because they’re fun or because everyone knows what one is, science stories involving bubbles (of all shapes and sizes) always attract plenty of media attention. BBC Four even produced a one hour documentary about the science of bubbles called ‘POP!” In 2003, I wrote a story for the Institute of Physics about antibubbles based on a paper by Stephane Dorbolo...

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From our archives: extreme observatories

Posted on Mar 4, 2013

From our archives: extreme observatories

Following the announcement that the UK government are providing £88m in funding for what will become the world’s biggest optical telescope, the European – Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), we delved into our archives. The E-ELT will be built in Chile’s “mirror valley” (the Atacama desert), but not all observatories are so easy to build or work in. In this feature from June 2006 Sky at Night magazine, Matter PR’s managing director David Reid tours some of the most inhospitable observatories on...

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Symbols matter

Posted on Feb 14, 2013

Symbols matter

Matter’s visual identity takes inspiration from the chemical symbols used in the Periodic Table. But where did its design come from and why have these symbols become so iconic? The Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements was devised by Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1871. It was the first time someone had drawn up a table ordering the elements by atomic mass (relative molar mass). Mendeleev noticed that if you arrange the elements in this way there was a regular spacing (or period) between elements of similar characteristics allowing you to organise them in sets. In recent years,...

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